US Army Corps of Engineers
Transatlantic Division

News Stories

  • January

    Far East District headquarters welcomes Jenny’s Coffee Shop

    There’s a new place to get your morning cup of joe as the Far East District officially welcomed
  • Semonite ‘coins’ TAD logistics specialist during visit

    WINCHESTER, Va. — Lt. Gen. Todd T. Semonite, the 54th Chief of Engineers and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer, “coined” TAD Logistics Specialist Tim O'Dell for his outstanding support to the Division members here at the headquarters and at deployed locations across the Middle East and Central Asia.
  • Semonite, Houston visit TAD headquarters

    WINCHESTER, Va. — Lt. Gen. Todd T. Semonite, the 54th Chief of Engineers and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and USACE Command Sergeant Major Bradley Houston, drove 70 miles through the winter mix that enveloped Northern Virginia to visit with the men and women of the Transatlantic Division here Jan. 7, 2020.
  • Buffalo District fights invasive hydrilla on the Great Lakes

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District is on a mission to fight hydrilla, an aggressive plant species that has wreaked havoc from Asia to every continent except Antarctica. “Hydrilla completely chokes out our waterways and impacts all the things we enjoy,” said Michael Greer, USACE Buffalo District project manager. “It affects water quality, the economy, businesses, hydropower and flood reduction - ultimately our health and our wallets.” “A single aquatic plant could put all of that at risk,” warned New York Senator Charles Schumer in 2017.
  • Special Projects Branch hits 10-year milestone

    In many organizations, there are some tasks and projects that just don’t seem to fit into an easily defined category. This was also the case for the Corps of Engineers Omaha District in 2009. The District had projects that needed to be completed, but didn’t quite fit the mold of the programs they were assigned to. The solution to that issue to the stand up the Special Projects Branch. It was a new concept when the first eight-person team was assembled to take on these outliers, which totaled more than $140 million that first year. Since then, the branch has grown to 52 people and nearly $600 million worth of work annually.