US Army Corps of Engineers
Transatlantic Division

News Stories

  • December

    Hazardous land used during Atomic Age has green future

    In 1945, following the United States’ detonation of two atomic bombs over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, World War II ended and the Atomic Age began. Research on the uses of atomic power also started and the forming of the United States’ Atomic Energy Commission was created to foster this.
  • Fuels PDT named USACE ‘Team of the Year’ for contracting

    The professionals of the Fuels Recurring Maintenance and Minor Repair Project Delivery Team gathered Dec. 16, 2019, to receive the 2019 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ “Team of the Year” Excellence in Contracting Award.
  • District employees celebrate holidays with unique traditions

    Sacramento District employees sure know how to throw a party—just ask them what they do for the holidays.
  • Corps constructs new hangar for Aerial Refueling Aircraft at Seymour Johnson AFB

    Work continues on a new $59.5 million state-of-the-art maintenance hangar at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, in Goldsboro, North Carolina. The facility, under construction by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, will support the new KC-46A Pegasus, a mid-air refueling tanker set to arrive at the installation in the summer of 2020.
  • Invasive species mussel in on Gavins Point Dam

    When you’re talking about the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ six mainstem dams on the Missouri River, the word small is a relative term. While the dams and their powerhouses vary in size, they are all imposing structures. For instance, Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, is the smallest of the six, yet it took 7 million cubic yards of earth to build and its three Kaplan generators are capable of generating electricity for 68,000 homes. This makes it that much more ironic that something as small as a zebra mussel could give it such big problems.